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Central carbon metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: an unexpected frontier.

TitleCentral carbon metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: an unexpected frontier.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsRhee KY, de Carvalho LPedro Sori, Bryk R, Ehrt S, Marrero J, Park SWoong, Schnappinger D, Venugopal A, Nathan C
JournalTrends Microbiol
Volume19
Issue7
Pagination307-14
Date Published2011 Jul
ISSN1878-4380
KeywordsAnti-Bacterial Agents, Biosynthetic Pathways, Carbon, Computational Biology, Evolution, Molecular, Genes, Bacterial, Genomics, Metabolomics, Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Abstract

Recent advances in liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry have enabled the highly parallel, quantitative measurement of metabolites within a cell and the ability to trace their biochemical fates. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), these advances have highlighted major gaps in our understanding of central carbon metabolism (CCM) that have prompted fresh interpretations of the composition and structure of its metabolic pathways and the phenotypes of Mtb strains in which CCM genes have been deleted. High-throughput screens have demonstrated that small chemical compounds can selectively inhibit some enzymes of Mtb's CCM while sparing homologs in the host. Mtb's CCM has thus emerged as a frontier for both fundamental and translational research.

DOI10.1016/j.tim.2011.03.008
Alternate JournalTrends Microbiol
PubMed ID21561773
PubMed Central IDPMC3601588
Grant ListAI064768 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
R01 AI063446 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
R21 AI081094 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI63446 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
R01 AI064768 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
AI081094 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States

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