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New Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanism Uncovered in Hunt for TB New Drug

An investigation by Weill Cornell Medicine scientists has yielded two breakthroughs in the pursuit of combating growing resistance to tuberculosis treatments. First, the team discovered a new strategy that tuberculosis-causing bacteria use to evade treatment. They also identified an experimental compound that might help circumvent drug resistance to the most widely used tuberculosis drug, isoniazid.

Tuberculosis is the top infectious disease killer worldwide and growing resistance to...

Weakening Tuberculosis Bacteria’s Defenses May Speed Treatment and Thwart Drug Resistance

By sabotaging one of the tuberculosis bacterium’s defenses against antibiotics, Weill Cornell Medicine investigators may have found a way to accelerate treatment for the disease and possibly overcome growing resistance to existing therapies.  

In a study published April 25 in Science Translational Medicine, Dr. Dirk Schnappinger and colleagues found a way to...

May 3 - Symposium on Microbial Systems Biology; 11:00 am- 5:00 pm; Belfer Research Building, Room BB204A/B/C

Weill Family Foundation

Global Health Research Laboratories

2018 Symposium on Microbial Systems Biology

 May 3, 2018  from 11:00 am- 5:00 pm

Belfer Research Building, Room BB204A/B/C

 

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Weill Cornell Medicine Faculty Recruitment Seminar

“New Approaches to Old Problems: Drug Resistance and Functional Gemonics in M. tuberculosis"

 

Jeremy Rock, Ph.D.

Post-doctoral Fellow

Harvard School of Public Health

 

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Study: Experimental Compound Protects Transplanted Hearts from Rejection

This image shows a section of a transplanted heart in a mouse that was given only CTLA4-Ig, a standard anti-rejection therapy. A large number of infiltrating immune cells are visible by their blue-staining nuclei, showing that the heart is undergoing rejection. Heart muscle cell nuclei are also stained blue. All images: “Brief treatment with a highly selective immunoproteasome inhibitor promotes long-term cardiac allograft acceptance in mice.” Karreci, Esilida Sula. PNAS, 2016. doi: 10....

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