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Impaired interleukin 12 production in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

TitleImpaired interleukin 12 production in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1994
AuthorsChehimi J, Starr SE, Frank I, D'Andrea A, Ma X, MacGregor RR, Sennelier J, Trinchieri G
JournalJ Exp Med
Volume179
Issue4
Pagination1361-6
Date Published1994 Apr 01
ISSN0022-1007
KeywordsAdult, Cell Line, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Interleukin-12, Interleukins, Male, Middle Aged, Monocytes, Staphylococcus aureus
Abstract

Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, asymptomatic or with acquired immunodeficiency virus, produced 10-fold less interleukin 12 (IL-12) free heavy chain and fivefold less biologically active IL-12 heterodimer than PBMC from uninfected healthy donors when challenged in vitro with the common human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast, PBMC from HIV-infected individuals and uninfected control donors produced similar levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-10, and PBMC from HIV-infected individuals produced three- to fourfold more IL-6 compared with PBMC from uninfected control donors. The defect in IL-12 production is not due to hyperproduction of IL-10, a cytokine exerting an autocrine-negative feedback on IL-12 production, but was directly related to HIV infection, as suggested by the reduced ability of monocytes infected in vitro with HIV to produce IL-12. IL-12 deficiency may be an important component of the immunodeficiency associated with HIV infection.

DOI10.1084/jem.179.4.1361
Alternate JournalJ Exp Med
PubMed ID7908324
PubMed Central IDPMC2191451
Grant ListCA-10815 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
CA-20833 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
CA-32898 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States

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