For COVID-19 vaccine updates, please review our information guide. For patient eligibility and scheduling availability, please visit VaccineTogetherNY.org.

FcgammaRIII-dependent inhibition of interferon-gamma responses mediates suppressive effects of intravenous immune globulin.

TitleFcgammaRIII-dependent inhibition of interferon-gamma responses mediates suppressive effects of intravenous immune globulin.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsPark-Min K-H, Serbina NV, Yang W, Ma X, Krystal G, Neel BG, Nutt SL, Hu X, Ivashkiv LB
JournalImmunity
Volume26
Issue1
Pagination67-78
Date Published2007 Jan
ISSN1074-7613
KeywordsAnimals, Flow Cytometry, Gene Expression, Humans, Immunoblotting, Immunoglobulins, Intravenous, Interferon-gamma, Listeriosis, Macrophage Activation, Macrophages, Mice, Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic, Receptors, IgG, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Signal Transduction, Transfection
Abstract

Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) suppresses autoantibody-mediated inflammation by inducing and activating the inhibitory Fc receptor FcgammaRIIb and downstream negative signaling pathways. We investigated the effects of IVIG on cellular responses to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), a potent macrophage activator that exacerbates inflammation. Our study showed that IVIG blocked IFN-gamma signaling and IFN-gamma-induced gene expression and suppressed IFN-gamma function in vivo during immune responses to Listeria monocytogenes and in an IFN-gamma-enhanced model of immune thrombocytopenic purpura. The mechanism of inhibition of IFN-gamma signaling was suppression of expression of the IFNGR2 subunit of the IFN-gamma receptor. The inhibitory effect of IVIG was mediated at least in part by soluble immune complexes and was dependent on FcgammaRIII but independent of FcgammaRIIb. These results reveal an unexpected inhibitory role for the activating FcgammaRIII in mediating suppression of IFN-gamma signaling and suggest that inhibition of macrophage responses to IFN-gamma contributes to the anti-inflammatory properties of IVIG.

DOI10.1016/j.immuni.2006.11.010
Alternate JournalImmunity
PubMed ID17239631

Weill Cornell Medicine Microbiology and Immunology 1300 York Avenue, Box 62 New York, NY 10065 Phone: (212) 746-6505 Fax: (212) 746-8587