For COVID-19 vaccine updates, please review our information guide. For patient eligibility and scheduling availability, please visit VaccineTogetherNY.org.

Expression profiling of host pathogen interactions: how Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the macrophage adapt to one another.

TitleExpression profiling of host pathogen interactions: how Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the macrophage adapt to one another.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsSchnappinger D, Schoolnik GK, Ehrt S
JournalMicrobes Infect
Volume8
Issue4
Pagination1132-40
Date Published2006 Apr
ISSN1286-4579
KeywordsAnimals, Humans, Macrophages, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Nitric Oxide, Phagosomes, Reactive Oxygen Species, Receptors, Cell Surface, Signal Transduction, Species Specificity, Tuberculosis, Virulence
Abstract

It has recently become feasible to quantify all mRNAs encoded by the genomes of bacterial pathogens and their eukaryotic host cells and to apply this approach to study the interaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with its primary host cell, the macrophage. These studies helped to identify regulatory circuits which mediate adaptation of the M. tuberculosis transcriptome to intraphagosomal environments and stimulated hypotheses for the function of these circuits in human tuberculosis. The macrophage transcriptome reacts to infections with the induction of a pathogen-unspecific expression program as well as the induction of pathogen-specific expression signatures, both of which contribute to the immunologic activation of the infected cell. M. tuberculosis induced changes in the macrophage transcriptome are mediated by Toll-like receptor dependent and Toll-like receptor independent signal transduction pathways. This response is shaped by macrophage produced reactive nitrogen and oxygen molecules and affected by viability and virulence of the pathogen.

DOI10.1016/j.micinf.2005.10.027
Alternate JournalMicrobes Infect
PubMed ID16517202
Grant ListR01AI44826 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
R01AI57443 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
R01HL68525 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States

Weill Cornell Medicine Microbiology and Immunology 1300 York Avenue, Box 62 New York, NY 10065 Phone: (212) 746-6505 Fax: (212) 746-8587