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Single telomere length analysis in , a high-resolution tool for examining fungal telomere length distribution and C-strand 5'-end processing.

TitleSingle telomere length analysis in , a high-resolution tool for examining fungal telomere length distribution and C-strand 5'-end processing.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsSwapna G, Yu EY, Lue NF
JournalMicrob Cell
Volume5
Issue9
Pagination393-403
Date Published2018 Aug 07
ISSN2311-2638
Abstract

Telomeres play important roles in genome stability and cell proliferation. Telomere lengths are heterogeneous and because just a few abnormal telomeres are sufficient to trigger significant cellular response, it is informative to have accurate assays that reveal not only average telomere lengths, but also the distribution of the longest and shortest telomeres in a given sample. Herein we report for the first time, the development of single telomere length analysis (STELA) - a PCR-based assay that amplifies multiple, individual telomeres - for , a basidiomycete fungus. Compared to the standard telomere Southern technique, STELA revealed a broader distribution of telomere size as well as the existence of relatively short telomeres in wild type cells. When applied to ∆ a mutant thought to be defective in telomere replication, STELA revealed preferential loss of long telomeres, whose maintenance may thus be especially dependent upon efficient replication. In comparison to ∆ the ∆ (telomerase null) mutant exhibited greater erosion of short telomeres, consistent with a special role for telomerase in re-lengthening extra-short telomeres. We also used STELA to characterize the 5' ends of telomere C-strand, and found that in , they terminate preferentially at selected nucleotide positions within the telomere repeat. Deleting altered the 5'-end distributions, suggesting that telomerase may directly or indirectly modulate C-strand 5' end formation. These findings illustrate the utility of STELA as well as the strengths of as a model system for telomere research.

DOI10.15698/mic2018.09.645
Alternate JournalMicrob Cell
PubMed ID30280102
PubMed Central IDPMC6167521

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